Moving abroad for work, play or retirement is a major life changing event for expatriates, especially those with families. The best way to make sure that you have completed everything in preparation of your departure is to make a list so you don’t overlook any important details. It is recommended that you read our comprehensive expat relocation checklist that covers a wide range of points for future or current expatriates. Here is our list for expats on the go:

  • Renew Your Passport

    As soon as you confirm your move, make sure you and your family have valid passports. You will need them as an expat family. If the passport will expire in six months, please remember to replace with a valid new one.

  • Vaccinations Check

    Contact your doctor and book appointments to find out if you and your family have vaccinations up to date. Also, double check with your doctor to see whether you need to have any vaccinations in your destination country. Vaccinations are a critical part of any expat assignment. You can obtain vital vaccination information for the country you are going to live at from the Centers for Disease Control

  • Renew Driving License

    If your national driving license needs renewing, please do so before you leave. Sometimes in a new country your driving license can be accepted by local government even if you are non-resident. Others will want an international divers license. 

  • Check All Insurance Policies And Obtain an International Health Insurance

    International health insurance cover is a necessity and should be your top considerations. Make sure you and your family are under comprehensive medical cover in your destination country. Expat Financial offers a wide range of expatriate health insurance plans designed specifically for any expatriates of any nationality around much of the world. With expat health insurance plans, you and your family’s health are protected through an appropriate level of expat insurance. Obtain a quote for one of our comprehensive international health plans

  • Contact Your Bank And Get a Global Account

    Explain to your bank that you are moving abroad. Ask your bank to offer a global account. Set up internet banking. Also, if you have loan or mortgage payments in your home country, please set up direct payment account with your bank while you are away. 

  • Check Compatibility of Your Electrical Devices

    Please double check with your destination country’s voltage range. Make sure that your electronic devices can be used.

  • Accommodation

    It is important to know where you and your family will be living. Do some research and make sure you know how you’re going to move your belongings. Also pay attention to pricing and budgeting. These kind of research will help you avoid mistakes and gain a smooth transition. There are many different expatriates sites which may help you via our Links Page.

  • Confirm your travel arragements

    This should be done at around six weeks before moving. You should check and confirm all your travel arrangements such as trains, flights or ferry reservations. Remember to make reservation to any temporary accommodation or hotels if you are not moving into your new home right away.

  • Cancel any subscriptions and pay outstanding bills

    Some people may forget to cancel any club memberships or subscriptions before they leave. Also, you should close relevant accounts and pay all outstanding bills.

  • Pack properly

    Pack the items that you are traveling with: passports, travel documents, currency, medicine, clothes, etc,. Double check all your rooms to make sure that everything that you want to move is packed away. There are lots of web sites with great packing lists.

  • Bring Medications

    If you are moving abroad, it is vital that you have your MD provide you with 5 to 6 months of prescriptions for your pre-existing medical conditions. Please make sure any drug bottles are clearly labeled. If you are going to a country with strict drug laws, it is vital that you have a doctors note explaining why you need this prescription in order to avoid any trouble with the police or border patrol.