Expat Healthcare in France and the ‘mutuelle’ system

Working in France yields many benefits when it comes to health insurance. The government run healthcare program deducts contributions directly from salaries, and reimburses patients usually 70 per cent of their medical costs. Although this is great news for expats, many residents and expats alike tend to rely on an extended insurance policy known as a mutuelle.

Young doctor checking an MR exposure

A mutuelle’s intended purpose is to fill the 30 per cent gap left behind from the government-funded health program, but depending on the mutuelle you choose, you may be entitled for additional coverage. There is also an additional program for people who are within
a certain income bracket called the CMU complémentaire. This program covers the remaining 30 per cent that reimbursements do not.

Most residents in France who have employment will pay into the social security plan will get access to the medical system. Students in most Universities in France will also get coverage there. European nationals can also apply for state healthcare once they become residents.

Keep in mind that the state does not cover costs incurred by psychologists, psychoanalysts, osteopaths, or chiropractors, nor does it cover any additional surplus fees which private practitioners may charge on top of the state fee. If you require this or other chronic care, it is in your best interest to find a mutuelle that suits you. Expat Financial can also source private international health insurance plans for expatriates in France. An expatriate may want a medical  plan that will cover him or her globally. This is especially important for American expatriates in European countries such as France.